The LRC Presents…

How Can Cancer Be Beaten?

Imperial College London oncologist, DR. JUSTIN STEBBING on new breakthroughs in personalized treatment.

Introduction by MICHAEL DECTER (Founding chair, Cancer Quality Council of Ontario), with a response by DR. ELIZABETH EISENHAUER (Research Lead for the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer).

RESERVE TICKETS

By 2009, cancer was responsible for 30% of all deaths in Canada, ahead of every other killer. And it is notoriously difficult to fight: since 1950, US cancer deaths have declined by just 6%, compared to 67% for heart disease.

But a form of treatment known as “immunotherapy” has recently led to a new generation of drugs, which use a patient’s own immune system against tumors. And Professor Justin Stebbing – an award-winning UK oncologist and the author of over 500 peer-reviewed papers – has won international recognition as a pioneer of this approach, as well as for his research into individually-tailored cancer treatments. So we are delighted to provide an opportunity in Toronto to hear from him directly.

“It’s only in the past few years that the relationship between cancer and the immune system has begun to be understood at the cellular and molecular level,” says Professor Stebbing. And his talk will describe some of the resulting success stories, which could offer years more high-quality life for many patients. Since these therapies are still in their infancy, he’ll also discuss which cancers are proving most amenable to treatment, as well as what’s on the horizon. Most importantly, Stebbing will explain his conviction that this new line of research represents a “breakthrough” in the fight against cancer.

We hope you’ll be able to join us on February 9th, for a lively public discussion of immunotherapy and personalized medicine’s promise, along with the further work necessary to fulfill it. And how a province that already spends over 40% of its program budget on healthcare – Ontario paid more than $44 billion in 2012 – might best bear the significant associated costs.


This event is available free to LRC subscribers or to all those who sign-up for our special event subscription offer of $49 for one year of the LRC. Otherwise tickets are $15 for the general public or $5 for students with a valid ID. Tickets can be purchased or reserved by clicking here.


 Professor Stebbing trained in medicine at Trinity College Oxford, where he gained a triple first class degree. After completion of junior doctor posts in Oxford, he undertook training and a residency at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in the US, returning to London to continue his career in oncology at The Royal Marsden and St Bartholomew’s Hospitals and now through Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust.

Professor Stebbing has published over 500 peer-reviewed papers in journals such as The Lancet, the New England Journal of Medicine, Blood, the Journal of Clinical Oncology and the Annals of Internal Medicine, as well as writing for national newspapers and presenting new data on optimal cancer therapies at major international conferences. His focus at Imperial is on new therapies in cancer, and the systemic management of patients with solid malignancies. His laboratory work is concentrated on new druggable target discovery.

He is a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians, the American Board of Internal Medicine and the Royal College of Pathologists, and sits on the advisory Boards of a number of international cancer committees. He chairs the World Vaccine Congress and is on the editorial board of a number of world leading general medical and cancer journals such as the Journal of Clinical Oncology. In 2011, Justin’s team published in Nature Medicine, outlining the groundbreaking discovery of a new cancer-causing gene and a totally new theory in cancer drug resistance. He was recently appointed the government’s first oncology professor funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) – the mechanism the government uses to fund research through the NHS.

Dr. Eisenhauer obtained her MD from Queen’s University Kingston, Canada in 1976 and subsequently received fellowships in Internal Medicine and Hematology from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons Canada. She is currently a Professor in the Departments of Oncology and Medicine at Queen’s and since 2012 she has been Head, Department of Oncology at Queen’s University and Cancer Program Medical Director at Kingston General Hospital in Kingston.

From 1982 to 2012, she was Director of the Investigational New Drug Program of the NCIC Clinical Trials Group where her major responsibilities lay in identifying and bringing into clinical trial novel cancer agents. Her major research interest has been the evaluation of new anti-cancer agents. She has coordinated over 170 phase I, II and III trials which have been carried out in institutions in Canada, the US and Europe. Several of these trials have led to the identification of new cancer agents now used in clinical practice. She also served as Interim Director of NCIC Clinical Trials Group from 2013-2014.

She has been active on a number of committees of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (Board of Directors), the American Association of Cancer Research, the European Society of Medical Oncology and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (Scientific Audit Committee) and the Canadian Cancer Society. From 2006-2009 she served as President, National Cancer Institute of Canada.

In addition to her current role as Department Head at Queen’s she currently is Research Lead for the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer and Co-Chair of the Canadian Cancer Research Alliance.

Dr. Eisenhauer obtained her MD from Queen’s University Kingston, Canada in 1976 and subsequently received fellowships in Internal Medicine and Hematology from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons Canada. She is currently a Professor in the Departments of Oncology and Medicine at Queen’s and since 2012 she has been Head, Department of Oncology at Queen’s University and Cancer Program Medical Director at Kingston General Hospital in Kingston.

From 1982 to 2012, she was Director of the Investigational New Drug Program of the NCIC Clinical Trials Group where her major responsibilities lay in identifying and bringing into clinical trial novel cancer agents. Her major research interest has been the evaluation of new anti-cancer agents. She has coordinated over 170 phase I, II and III trials which have been carried out in institutions in Canada, the US and Europe. Several of these trials have led to the identification of new cancer agents now used in clinical practice. She also served as Interim Director of NCIC Clinical Trials Group from 2013-2014.

She has been active on a number of committees of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (Board of Directors), the American Association of Cancer Research, the European Society of Medical Oncology and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (Scientific Audit Committee) and the Canadian Cancer Society. From 2006-2009 she served as President, National Cancer Institute of Canada.

In addition to her current role as Department Head at Queen’s she currently is Research Lead for the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer and Co-Chair of the Canadian Cancer Research Alliance.