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From the archives

Untying the Knot

A new book untangles historical confusion and contemporary anxieties about marriage

Thou Art Anxious

Decisions, decisions

Keep in Touch

Why digital connections can’t sustain health, happiness or politics

Back Issues

January–February 2015

Cover art and pictures throughout the issue by Celia Krampien Celia Krampien is a freelance illustrator living in Oakville, Ontario. Since graduating from Sheridan College's illustration program in 2012, she has worked with various clients including The Globe and Mail, Marketing Magazine and the Los Angeles Times.

Wolverine Diplomacy

Making sense of the Harper government's foreign policy

Madelaine Drohan

Hew That Wood, Draw That Water

Is Canada really capable of innovating?

Dimitry Anastakis

Apiary Wisdom

A book about bees as creatures and bees as teachers

Ernesto Guzman-Novoa

Sending Billions Home

How immigrant workers’ remittance payments reshape the world

Doug Saunders

Don’t Call It a Comeback

While indigenous people keep resisting assimiliation, it’s Canada that needs to catch up

Hayden King and Shiri Pasternak

Campaign Literature

Displaying Trudeau's charm and empathy—which might not be enough

Antonia Maioni

Thoughtful Troubadour

A Canadian icon on his music, faith and turbulent times

Mark D. Dunn

One Bumptious Blonde

An American-born writer's adventures, from Oxford to Toronto

Grace Westcott

Ice Maiden Extraordinaire

A forgotten Canadian superhero returns

Michael Taube

Sea to Sea Power

The centuries of naval struggle that shaped Canada's development

Peter William Twist

Breaking the Silence

Rudy Wiebe's troubling new novel explores a suicide

Anna Wilson

A Refusenik Returns

Israeli politics frame David Bezmozgis' bitterly funny tale of Jewish Crimea

Norman Ravvin

A Melting Border

Surviving on the margin between China and North Korea

Andre Schmid

What Might Have Been

Veteran observers go behind the scenes of the second referendum

George Anderson

Muted Voices

Holding governments accountable is getting a whole lot harder

Anna Esselment